日本語版 「サイパン島陥落」出版      The Taking Of Saipan    日本語     Send Email to Kimi

Table of Content    Douglas Westfall     Ryozo Kimihira

Genkichi Ichikawa, Japanese Navy,     Richard Meadows, US Marine Marines,

Articles by Ryozo Kimihira to understand inside Japan ,

 

To buy: link to www.SpecialBooks.com (購入)

 

 

The Taking of Saipan

    Two Sides to Every Battle In WWII

The Memoirs of Cpl. Richard Meadows & Cpl. Genkichi Ichikawa 市川源吉

By Douglas Westfall & Ryozo Kimihira Edited by Ian Mann

©2014 The Paragon Agency, Publishers Orange, CA

Contents

Preface …………………………………...viii

Foreword…………………………………ix

Prolog   The Beginning of the End of World War II ....................1

Chapter One       During the Battle of Tarawa ....................................9

Chapter Two      During the Battle of Tinian ....................................31

Chapter Three    The Battle for Saipan .............................................49

Chapter Four     The US Airbase on Saipan……………..…………99

Chapter Five      Taking Japan…..................................................... 121

Epilog                 After a War in California ......................................137

Appendices
  …………… ………………………… …………..143

Ranks of Opposing Nations ............................................................ 148 

Colophon ....................................................................................... 149  

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Douglas Westfall, Orange, CA, 2014

PREFACE

In 1993, I read about a man who had developed a translation program between American English and Japanese. His name-Dr. Ryozo Kimihira. He lived within a half hour of my home, so I called on him to visit; I was vastly interested in his work. What happened next was a 20 year friendship between Kimi and I as we helped each other understand our respective language, homelands, and history-which had brought us together. Some years later he moved away and we lost touch.

When giving a lecture on WWII at a local men's church group a few years ago, a member approached me after the talk. Richard Meadows, who lived nearby in my town of Orange, was a US Marine who had fought in WWII in places like Tarawa, Tinian and Saipan. I had recently published a WWII book on Saipan about the giant B-29 aircraft, that had bombed Japan during the war, so was interested in his story.

We sat down and talked for a while until his story took a twist. After taking the beach at Saipan in 1944, the Marines all went souvenir hunting the next morning. The battle was not yet over, but there was a break in the fighting. Some took bayonets, others a pistol, etc. Dick Meadows found a diary and he brought it home with him after the war.

Sometime later at Dick's house, he showed it to me, this seventy year old relic. A remarkable piece of history which few knew about. I immediately offered to publish Dick's story in book form ? if we could also publish the diary. To this he agreed.

I remembered Kimi and knew he also had a home in Japan, so I located Kimi in Hawaii. I asked if he could help translate the diary and I sent him scans of the pages. Slowly the story came to me from Kimi, about a young Japanese soldier on Saipan. I found it remarkable the stories were a parallel of two young men trained for warfare, essentially waiting to meet each other on a beach. The diary has since been returned to the family in Japan. It has taken 70 years to get to this point in the story.

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Ryozo Kimihira

FOREWORD

In 1944, I was age 7 and lived in Setagaya City which is a residential area of Tokyo. Every house had an underground shelter which I and my elder brother had made in order to escape the US air raids, from November of 1944 to August of 1945. After the US took over Saipan, housewives including my mother, were trained to put out fires caused by the air raids. I saw B-29s flying over Tokyo and one night, a fire bomb hit a house in the next block. The housewives worked hard to put out the fires as they had practiced.

I heard a lot of propaganda by the Japanese Military to advocate never-give-up the fight and also the Emperor's announcement accepting the Potsdam Declaration through then-government operated radio station NHK — then the only radio station in Japan. Over three million Japanese citizens and soldiers were victims of the War. Surprisingly, 70 years after the War the young people of Japan do not know of the war against US. Some ask, "Who won?" I believe we need to convey the tragedy of WWII to the coming generation so we do not repeat the stupid mistakes of that war.

While I was writing this book, I visited Saipan in October of 2013. It is a beautiful and peaceful island except some of the residues of the war such as Banzai Cliff (Suicide Cliff) and Last Command Post where four Commanders committed suicide before the night of the last Banzai attack.

I believe we need to explain to Americans how Japan started the war against US with almost no possibility to win and caused many meaningless operations such as the Banzai attack.

— Ryozo Kimihira, Oahu, HI, 2014

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Ryozo (Kimi) Kimihira was born in 1938 and was the youngest amateur radio (HAM) operator in Japan (JA1LJ). He later attended the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japanese version of MIT), majoring in electronic engineering. Here he earned a BA, MA and PhD degrees. Kimi then worked for a small company named Akai, founded by Saburo Akai and in 1972, moved to Los Angeles to work for Akai America. Here he attended UCLA business school and received an MBA then started his own business: Kimihira & Taylor Associates, Inc., an International Consulting Firm in Los Angeles.

He moved to Hawaii in 2006 as a place for retirement but could not stay in Oahu due to his active character. Then, started the new business JRN. Also, Kimi started consulting work for the business between Japan and China. In 2012, Kimi went to Morocco with his wife and found Aragan

Oil (Kimi’s wife loves Aragan Oil), which is natural skin care product. He then began to import this to Japan.

He has many venture companies in both the US and Japan and formed Japan Rep Network, JRN, a nation wide manufacturers rep organization which represents small-to-medium companies with good technology but no sales network. JRN has currently 70 contracted reps throughout Japan. Kimi is an active consultant specializing in international business between Japan and the US, China, and Morocco. Kimi has authored books in Japanese with titles like: How to Effectively Use a Consultant, Business English, Doing Business in the US, and Active Life for 60 Year Olds.

For the past 5 years, Kimi has become interested in history, especially the history of Japan’s wars. He has discovered many elements which should be understood by Americans not only to know why things happened in the past but also to understand the Japanese culture and have a better relationship with Japan today.

  Ryozo Kimihira, Ohahu ,Hawaii 

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Genkichi Ichikawa

Genkichi Ichikawa was born in 1921 in Shizuoka City. He also had two older brothers who went into the Japanese military before him: Shichio and Yasuichi. Genkichi was drafted into service and joined a Navy Paratroop division then was stationed at Yokosuka Navy Base. He sailed for Saipan in September of 1943 and arrived at Saipan a week later, to begin fortifications for battle on the island. He kept a ‘Kaigun nikki’ (Navy Diary), printed in 1943.

Pvt. Genkichi Ichikawa —Diary— September 1943

On September 8th, we left Yokosuka Port being seen off by ten thousand citizens. I decided not to return again. On the 14th, we arrived at the Southern island of Saipan. Since then, already three and half months have passed. Everyday, we drill hard to attack the U.S. and British enemies that are right in front of us.

We climbed many times Mt. Tapochau, which is the highest point on the island. Our long-waiting mail did not arrive. Nothing is as delightful as mail. As the year is ending, I am doing well, working on this island in the Pacific Ocean.

It is four o’clock on Sunday. I am writing a letter at the quiet barracks in the Southern Islands. I am at the corner of a balcony. Two palm trees are slowly moving by the wind. Beyond the trees, the flag of naval ensign shines brilliantly in the southern sky. Music is coming from somewhere. Songs with many memories are heard, one after another from a gramophone.  

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Richard Meadows, US Marine Marines, 1924-

 

 

 

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Articles by Ryozo Kimihira to understand inside Japan ,

The Decision Making Process on War , page40?

WWII Leadership, page 42

Daihonei,  The Imperial General Headquarters? page 43

Factions in the Army Koudouha and Touseiha, page 44

Assassinations  By the Japanese Military, page 45

Tojon's Cabinet, page page 46

Gyokusai Banzai Attack, page 67

Escape Ttempt by Masatake Kimihira(Ryozo's uncle) from Saipan, page 88

Masatake Kimihira, page 91

Senjinkun, Field Service Code,  which was cause of Banzai Attack,  page 94-95

Calendar of Japanese Forces For the Battle of Saipan, page 118-119

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